Posts by Ken Kostel

Antarctic Krill—the Unsung Heroes of Climate Mitigation in the Southern Ocean

Antarctic krill—and more importantly, krill poop—are an important part of the global climate system. Unlike many species that migrate miles across the surface, krill migrate vertically, depositing their carbon-filled waste deep below the surface. This helps mitigate climate change, but they’re under threat from capture for use as fishmeal to feed aquaculture operations or oils…

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Jellies of the Twilight Zone

jellyfish

Jellyfish have lived on earth more than 600 million years, and boast a diverse evolutionary history. Most jellyfish species live in what is known as the ocean’s “Twilight Zone.” Little is known about this ocean region since it is vastly underexplored, but WHOI is on a mission to change that. With our new AUV Mesobot,…

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WHOI and 4Ocean Search the Twilight Zone

Jellyfish play a vital role in a healthy ocean. But we need more insight into exactly what that role is–and how jellyfish fit into the changes taking place in the ocean every day. Learn more about Jellies of the Twilight Zone. That’s why we partnered with 4Ocean to release this Jellyfish Bracelet. The purchase of each bracelet funds…

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Following the Elusive Swordfish

Swordfish may be among the most universally recognized apex predators in the open ocean, but given that they spend half of their lives in deeper waters and aren’t easily observed and knowing where and when they travel has been a long-standing mystery. That is, until recently, when researchers from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and…

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Mesobot: Following Life in the Twilight Zone

Mesobot is a brand new underwater vehicle designed to reveal what lives in the ocean’s twilight zone. Mesobot can follow animals as they move through the darkness and as they migrate from the depths to the surface and back. The twilight zone is vast and remote, but is threatened by unregulated fishing and climate change.…

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Open Wide

The jaw of the loosejaw dragonfish (Photostomias goodyeari) is a marvel of the animal kingdom. It has no floor and is only attached by a hinge, a tendon, and a modified tongue bone. This series of images shows the incredible extent to which it can open it’s jaw—an indication of the size of the prey…

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A Tunnel to the Twilight Zone

Last year, researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and the Applied Physics Lab at the University of Washington (UW) discovered that when white sharks are ready to feast, they ride large, swirling ocean currents known as eddies to fast-track their way to the ocean twilight zone—a layer of the ocean between 200 and 1000 meters…

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A Light in the Darkness

LAPIS image

A  key feature of Deep-See is the Large-Area Plankton Imaging System, or LAPIS camera, mounted on the front of the vehicle. It was developed at WHOI and captures 24 megapixel, high-definition images of the many creatures large and small that live in the ocean twilight zone, especially those with gelatinous bodies. The camera uses powerful…

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