Posts by Ken Kostel

Aria Finkelstein crafts policy to help legislators manage the twilight zone

Aria Ritz-Finkelstein

Aria Ritz Finkelstein is a PhD candidate in Urban Studies and Planning at MIT, and is currently a guest student in marine policy at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, where she helps generate policy recommendations on management of the Ocean Twilight Zone—a mysterious stratum of ocean beneath the sunlit layer. Finkelstein began her career hoping to…

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The oceans’ twilight zone must be studied now, before it is too late

Elongated bristlemouth

Members of WHOI’s Ocean Twilight Zone project were instrumental in the recent formation of JETZON (Joint Exploration of the Twilight Zone Ocean Network), an international group linking all of the world’s major twilight zone research projects. Leaders of JETZON published a commentary in the journal Nature arguing that “Exploitation and degradation of the mysterious layer…

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Open ocean diving observations

Watch and learn how Ocean Twilight Zone fish biologist conducts blue- and black-water dives in the open ocean and what he sees during the day and at night when animals from the twilight zone migrate to the surface under cover of darkness.

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The Ocean Twilight Zone’s crucial carbon pump

When CO₂ enters the ocean, where does this heat-trapping gas go? By Madeline Drexler When heat-trapping carbon dioxide from the atmosphere sinks into the ocean and turns to organic carbon, how much of it sinks to the deep ocean and how quickly? Ken Buesseler, a geochemist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), has been working…

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Tagging sharks to study the twilight zone

Former MIT-WHOI Joint Program graduate student and current University of Washington post-doc Camrin Braun and his team on the charter fishing vessel Machaca tagged two porbeagles, a relative of the goblin shark, about 30 miles east of Chatham, Mass., in 2019. One shark was a female nearly seven feet long and weighing 270 pounds. A…

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Report reveals ‘unseen’ human benefits from ocean twilight zone

Value beyond view cover

Did you know that there’s a natural carbon sink—even bigger than the Amazon rainforest—that helps regulate Earth’s climate by sucking up to six billion tons of carbon from the air each year? A new report from researchers at WHOI reveals for the first time the unseen—and somewhat surprising—benefits that people receive from the ocean’s twilight…

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