In the Field

Tagging Along into the Twilight Zone

porbeagle shark fin with SPOT tag

Before the rest of the Ocean Twilight Zone team heads out next week on the Neil Armstrong, there was tagging to be done of other potential food chain investigators— the kind that are blue-grey (not yellow), that swim autonomously (no batteries or propellers), with sharp teeth and a good sense for where the food may…

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A Light in the Darkness

LAPIS image

A  key feature of Deep-See is the Large-Area Plankton Imaging System, or LAPIS camera, mounted on the front of the vehicle. It was developed at WHOI and captures 24 megapixel, high-definition images of the many creatures large and small that live in the ocean twilight zone, especially those with gelatinous bodies. The camera uses powerful…

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Who goes there?

Niskin bottles

  As the Ocean Twilight Zone expedition on the NOAA Ship Henry B. Bigelow off the US East Coast winds down, the scientists aboard are taking the measure of the immense amount of data that’s so far been collected over the past 13 days. In addition to acoustic data, net samples, and images from Deep-See,…

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Trawling the Depths

Identifying the catch

Mesopelagic trawl sampling is still going strong on the NOAA Ship Henry B. Bigelow with one more round tomorrow before they finish the cruise with more than two days of acoustic surveys. Probably the most celebrated animal they’ve caught so far was a paper nautilus or Argonaut (Argonauta argo) that featured in an earlier post.…

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Up Close with a Lancetfish

Lancetfish

One of the highlights from the mid-water trawl last night on NOAA Ship Henry B. Bigelow was this lancetfish (Alepisaurus ferox). Lancetfish are one of the top predators in the twilight zone and can grow to more than 2 meters (6 feet) in length—though this one was only about 15 inches. They are also voracious…

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The Expedition Begins

Paper nautilus

On the second day of their 15-day expedition to explore the ocean twilight zone aboard NOAA Ship Henry B. Bigelow, scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and National Marine Fisheries deployed Deep-See in the Atlantic Ocean. That first deployment was in relatively shallow water to test systems for a deeper deployment the next day,…

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Once More Into the Twilight Zone

Deep-See deployment

On July 25, scientists embarked on the 2019 Ocean Twilight Zone expedition aboard NOAA Ship  Henry B. Bigelow. A team made up of WHOI and NOAA Fisheries researchers departed Newport, R.I., Thursday morning and headed south towards the edge of the continental shelf. This will be the first full scientific mission into the ocean twilight…

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