Posts Tagged ‘Deep-See’

A Light in the Darkness

LAPIS image

A  key feature of Deep-See is the Large-Area Plankton Imaging System, or LAPIS camera, mounted on the front of the vehicle. It was developed at WHOI and captures 24 megapixel, high-definition images of the many creatures large and small that live in the ocean twilight zone, especially those with gelatinous bodies. The camera uses powerful…

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Once More Into the Twilight Zone

Deep-See deployment

On July 25, scientists embarked on the 2019 Ocean Twilight Zone expedition aboard NOAA Ship  Henry B. Bigelow. A team made up of WHOI and NOAA Fisheries researchers departed Newport, R.I., Thursday morning and headed south towards the edge of the continental shelf. This will be the first full scientific mission into the ocean twilight…

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The Deep-See Peers into the Depths: A new vehicle illuminates life hidden in the ocean twilight zone

WHOI mechanical engineer Kaitlyn Tradd sits on the new towed vehicle Deep-See

In the ocean’s shadowy depths lies one of the Earth’s last frontiers: the ocean twilight zone. It’s a vast swath of water extending throughout the world’s oceans from 650 to 3,280 feet (200 to 1,000 meters) below the surface, and it abounds with life: small but fierce-looking fish, giant glowing jellies, and microscopic animals that feed marine life higher up the ocean’s food web.

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Dissecting the Deep-See

The Deep-See is a new, sensor-filled platform for observing animals in the ocean twilight zone and estimating their biomass (amount) and biodiversity (species or type). The vehicle is towed behind a research ship using an electro-optical cable that can transmit data back to scientists on board in real time. Weighing about 2,500 pounds and extending 16 feet…

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